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Analyst: Estonian low wages have become a long-term risk

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So in the first sentence of the article, it states both "high unemployment" and "lack of available workforce" are problems. Generally, one solves the other, except in cases where the available (unemployed) workforce does not have the skills to meet the demand of employers.

So if that's the case, then should more money be spent on training? Reply to the comment answer
~ameeriklane [26.11.2012, 12:17]
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If they going to increase the wages than increase it where it matters. Not local politicians, governors and basically half of the Estonian work force who are bureaucrats and work to the state. Sweden had this similar problem back in the 80's. If a politician gets paid 5000 euros a month plus the perks, but a pilot gets only 1600 than there is a problem. Reply to the comment answer
~kendal its good [26.11.2012, 15:13]
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Adding to what "ameeriklane" wrote. Why on Earth are there so many local politicians? There is a bunch of them in every bush. Cut back on politicians by making larger "Linnavalitsus"... as it is some there are mayor´s ruling over just a few hundred people and such. Completely insane waste of money.

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~TheSwede [27.11.2012, 16:09]
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"Adding to what "ameeriklane" wrote. Why on Earth are there so many local politicians? There is a bunch of them in every bush."

That's sort of an issue also and applies to all micro EU member states (such as Baltics, Slovenia and like).

They all have very costly governments to run compared to GDP, as they need to operate a full government with a bunch of muncipalities attached, they need to run embassies in many countries, they need to control their air space and so on.

In the end, the big States of the Union always will have to pay the difference as micros states are not able to provide this all by themselves (especially when they are among the poorest of the Union).

For instance, the airspace in the Baltics is controlled on behalf of them by NATO and the gross payer are the German taxpayers.

In addition to that, the locals suffer lack of public services as there is not enough money in the game to finance all the fun.

The Baltics should have merged into a Baltic confederation long ago, but they can't agree on anything. It starts with the battle of Riga and Tallinn airport as the hub of the Baltics and ends with non-agreements on financing joint venture projects such as the power plant in Ignalina.

On top of that, Estonia has the illusion to be sort of a Finnish suburb, but that's another story, though. Reply to the comment answer
~knut albers [27.11.2012, 16:42]
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